Facebuilding: How, Who and Why is it Needed?

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Today we want to discuss facebuilding. Today everyone is carried away by a healthy lifestyle; everyone runs, eats right, chooses natural and organic, prefers to spend time outdoors, and not in the virtual halls of the National Casino AU, listening to lectures on genetics and anti-age. People are obsessed with the idea of pushing aging as far as possible. Face building fits perfectly into this concept. It does not change appearance, does not block facial expressions, it just tones the muscles – and harmonizes facial features. But does it really work? Let’s figure it out together.

How Does Face Building Work?

Basically, this is exactly what it sounds like: repetitive movements and exaggerated facial expressions to activate and build muscle. Think of this as resistance training for the face – by strengthening the core muscles that hold everything, sagging around the jaw and eyes may be less likely over time. Aging of the face is caused by a loss of elasticity, as well as the gradual movement of fat pads between muscles and skin, which tend to slide down over time. 

The idea behind the exercise is that by building up the muscles, the fat pads will be more likely to stay in place, making the face look plump and younger. “I recommend doing facial exercises every day,” says New York City dermatologist Doris Day, MD. “We train our face every time we express our emotions, and most people overuse certain muscles, which ultimately leads to weakening of the opposite muscles. When you frown often enough to wrinkle, you overuse those muscles and weaken the muscles that lift and smile because you use them less. “

Gymnastics or, as it is also called, yoga for the face has come into fashion for a long time and has become popular both among housewives and among celebrities. She came to us from Europe in the distant 90s, when every woman could stand for hours in front of the mirror, making various grimaces. Schools and classes began to open up everywhere where women were taught basic exercises and given guidelines to help them stay young for longer.

Benefits

facebuilding

Photo by Erik Brolin on Unsplash

What does yoga for the face give us? We have identified a number of positive changes: 

  • Bags under the eyes disappear; 
  • Swelling of the face goes away; 
  • Reduces the appearance of chronic fatigue; 
  • Reduces the appearance of chronic fatigue; 
  • The second chin becomes visually smaller; 
  • The shape of the face becomes clearer, and the cheekbones stand out clearly; 
  • Facial wrinkles go away; 
  • Cheeks become taut and plump; 
  • A natural glow appears. 

Of course, such consequences are the result of systematic training. Professionals recommend doing a series of exercises, first every day for several months, and then every other day, so that the result is fixed. Like any sport and muscle training, face building has a number of contraindications for those who should not use this technique. Inflammation of the jaw joints, problems with the vertebrae of the neck, viral diseases and fever are associated problems that should be consulted with a doctor before starting a facial workout. This yoga should be done with caution during pregnancy and chronic thyroid diseases.

Exercises 

Before proceeding directly to the exercises, let’s consider several recommendations for organizing training: 

  1. Take a photo “before”, so that after 2-3 weeks you can do it again and check the results. Thus, you can add or change the complex to make it more individual. 
  2. It is recommended to conduct face-building in front of a mirror. 
  3. Treat your hands with an antiseptic or use gloves to prevent infection in cracks and open wounds. 
  4. Exercise with a straight back and shoulders laid back for less stress on the spine. 
  5. Gymnastics should be carried out from the top of the face, gradually going down. 
  6. Evening yoga is considered more effective, as after the muscles of the face will have enough time to relax and rest.

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