Emmys 2015 Recap and Winners

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Andy Samberg spoke the truth: there are so many shows and so little time.

In his opening number for the 67th Emmy Awards, Samberg opened with a pre-recorded, star-studded video in which he sang about the struggles of keeping up with TV shows this year. It really is hard to keep up with everything that is currently on air. Even I didn’t watch all of the Emmy-nominated shows. (I have the limited series nominees still to binge.)

But the wonderful video led into a monologue that hit some highs and lows. There were diversity jokes that were sadly necessary and political jokes that rightfully zinged Kim Davis and Donald Trump.

At one point, Samberg revealed the username and password for an HBO Now account for all to use. It worked. I was able to sign in, but with the entire world also signing in, watching a show is actually impossible. It did provide the Internet with some great trolls who changed his username, though.

The Emmys also spoiled the endings for all of the shows that went off the air this season as they tried to honor the final seasons. Hint for next time? Don’t play scenes from the final episodes. Thanks.

In a surprise appearance, Tracy Morgan announced the winner for outstanding drama series (Game of Thrones). Morgan was critically injured in a car accident in June 2014 that left him in a coma for eight days. He made minor public appearances until last night.  

History was made when Viola Davis became the first black actress to win an Emmy for best lead actress in a drama series and gave an amazing speech. She said, “Let me tell you something: The only thing that separates women of color from anyone else is opportunity. You cannot win an Emmy for roles that are simply not there.”

Other amazing speeches came from Transparent’s Jill Soloway and Jeffrey Tambor, who won for best directing in a comedy and lead actor in a comedy, respectively. They both honored transgendered individuals and Soloway highlighted the inequalities faced by transgender people.

Jon Hamm (finally) became the only actor from Mad Men to win an Emmy for the show. It was well-deserved. He also crawled on stage sans stairs because why not?

Uzo Aduba became the first woman to win an award for best supporting comedy actress and best supporting drama actress for the same character. (She won last year for comedy for Orange is the New Black and this year for drama.)

But there were some disappointing losses. Tatiana Maslany, who finally received an Emmy nom for Orphan Black, lost to Viola Davis. I’m not complaining about Davis’ win; I am so thrilled about it, but I do hope Maslany can take an Emmy away at some point. She has an uncanny ability to play multiple characters at a time and deserves to be honored for it. It’s also unfortunate to know that comedy queen Amy Poehler will never win an Emmy for Parks and Recreation.

Overall, HBO took home the most Emmys with 40, followed by ABC with 14.

In comedy, Veep dominated with four of the seven awards for comedy series, and Olive Kitteridge led the limited series categories with six of the seven wins. And Jon Stewart’s team took home multiple awards for their final complete season.     .

Winners of the evening:
Outstanding comedy series: Veep
Outstanding drama series: Game of Thrones
Outstanding variety talk series: The Daily Show with Jon Stewart
Outstanding variety sketch series: Inside Amy Schumer
Outstanding limited series: Olive Kitteridge
Outstanding reality-competition program: The Voice

Outstanding lead actor in a comedy series: Jeffrey Tambor on Transparent
Outstanding lead actress in a comedy series: Julia Louis-Dreyfus on Veep
Outstanding lead actor in a drama series: Jon Hamm on Mad Men
Outstanding lead actress in a drama series: Viola Davis on How to Get Away with Murder
Outstanding lead actor in a limited series or movie: Richard Jenkins on Olive Kitteridge

Outstanding lead actress in a limited series or movie: Frances McDormand on Olive Kitteridge
Outstanding supporting actor in a comedy series: Tony Hale on Veep
Outstanding supporting actress in a comedy series: Allison Janney on Mom
Outstanding supporting actor in a drama series: Peter Dinklage on Game of Thrones
Outstanding supporting actress in a drama series: Uzo Aduba on Orange is the New Black
Outstanding supporting actor in a limited series or movie: Bill Murray on Olive Kitteridge
Outstanding supporting actress in a limited series or movie: Regina King on American Crime

Outstanding directing for a comedy series: Jill Soloway for Transparent
Outstanding directing for a drama series: David Nutter for Game of Thrones
Outstanding directing for a variety series: Chuck O’Neil for The Daily Show with Jon Stewart
Outstanding directing for limited series, movie or dramatic special: Lisa Cholodenko for Olive Kitteridge

Outstanding writing for a comedy series: Simon Blackwell, Armando Iannucci and Tony Roche for Veep
Outstanding writing for a drama series: David Benioff and D.B. Weiss for Game of Thrones
Outstanding writing for a variety series: The Daily Show with Jon Stewart
Outstanding writing for a limited series, movie or dramatic special: Jane Anderson for Olive Kitteridge

Read more Entertainment News on ClicheMag.com

Emmys 2015 Recap and Winners: Photo: AP

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