Bright Eyes

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(c) Peter Chee

Knowing how to work with a difficult eye shape can often be a bit challenging. I have selected four of the most common eye shapes my clients tend to have issues with. When it comes to applying eye shadow, a “one style fits all” approach is not ideal. The most important trick to playing up your eyes is using the right colors and techniques for these difficult shapes, whether your eyes are close-set, wide-set, or deep-set. Every tip below has a number chart to help you along the way. A highlighting shade will be a color that is usually light and shimmery to brighten up the eye and highlight the brow bone. A midtone shade is a color that is slightly darker than the highlighting shade and can be blues, greens, plums, or any other medium shade you desire. Your contouring shade will be a dark color—such as black—for a smokey eye, or deep plums, greens, grays, and blues. Color options are endless and the basic application principles always remain the same. With these easy to follow eye charts, you will master the technique for your eyes just like the pros! BY JAMIE O’NEILL

 

 

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Hidden Eyelid

The hidden eyelid is the most requested ‘how-to’ I am asked by my clients! A hidden eyelid is one where your natural crease is hidden by excess skin and it creates the appearance of a hood over the eyelid. This can occur with age or genetics. With a hidden eye lid, you should not use the lightest shades on the lid because it draws attention to the part of the eye that makes it more apparent. Remember, light brings things forward and dark pushes them back.  In the case of the hidden eyelid, using thick black eyeliner and lashes will really make the eyes pop. You may also choose to use a dark eye shadow and build upwards to blend it out—kind of like a smokey eye.

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Wide-Set Eyes

Just as the name implies, wide-set eyes can be described as eyes that have a space greater than the width of one eye between them. The overall goal with the wide-set eye is to visually ‘push’ the appearance of the eyes closer together. The basic color pattern will be darker colors on the inside of the eye, and lighter colors on the outside, a complete opposite of the close set eye application. You can sweep your contouring shade under the eye close to the lash line as you would apply eyeliner. To open up your eyes while still using dark colors, line your waterline with white eye liner.

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Deep-Set Eyes

If you have deep-set eyes you know that they can create unique makeup challenges. You will want to focus on using shades that brighten and open the eye instead of accentuating the natural crease that you already have. You will want to apply your highlighting shade on the lower lid. Next, you will want to sweep a mid-tone shade up and into the brow bone. This shade should not have too much color but should not be as light as the highlighting color. A light pink or light beige tone will be perfect. You will then use your contouring shade just on the outer crease and then gently sweep it under the lash line.  It is important to avoid using heavy eyeliner on the top lid, since the darkness will just create shadows. If you must wear eyeliner on the top, then keep it thin and as close to the lash line as possible.

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Close-Set Eyes

If your eyes are small, you will want to avoid using darker colors all over the lower lid. Remember that using lighter shades towards the middle and inner corners will make your eyes appear more open. If you apply darker shadows, keep the focus to the outer crease. Using dark all over will cause your eyes to look smaller and closed off.  The color application is laid out in the eye chart below. Remember that blending the shades together is necessary to achieve a seamless look.

Photographs courtesy of Mirabella

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