Tag Archives Fashion sustainability

Interview with Lazy Hype Founder Lizeth Hernandez

by

   Have you heard of the hottest new sustainable fashion brand?

Introducing Lazy Hype, the next generation of sustainable fashion. The newly launched brand offers lounge and activewear ethically-made from recycled materials. Through transparent practices, green manufacturing and promoting eco-conscious lifestyles, Lazy Hype is aiming to spread the word about sustainability through fashion.

Q & A with Lazy Hype Founder, Lizeth Hernandez 

What made you want to start a sustainable lounge & active wear clothing line?

“Living in San Francisco changed my perspective on a lot because it’s such a progressive and innovative city. I clearly saw the need and demand for sustainable products. Also, I noticed the power of marketing and how proclaimed sustainable brands were selling products at extremely high prices, so they could spend a lot of dollars on marketing initiatives. I didn’t want that strategy for Lazy Hype because I wanted it to be accessible to everyone, for a bigger impact on our planet, which is why prices are affordable. I’ve always loved active and loungewear, so I thought why not try to make a sustainable version of what the masses like to call “lazy” attire and organically create “hype” around it.”

Are your clothes featured in any stores and if not is that something you would be interested in?

“The clothes are not in any stores at the moment. We are more interested in positioning ourselves in workout studios, gyms, and small boutiques, due to the fact they we are still a small business. We also want to make sure that the growth is truly organic and that is super protected, we plan to be extremely selective.”

How long has Lazy Hype been in business?

“Lazy Hype just launched on April 2, 2021. We are super excited to branch out into more categories like baby and men’s, hopefully very soon.”

What is your favorite item from your collection?

“My favorite item in the collection that took me the longest to create is the leggings. Who needs denim?! When you can wear leggings! For me leggings are my everyday uniform/essential, so I wanted to make a comfortable legging, that really held everything together, no muffin tops haha, sustainable, and affordable. I’m pretty proud to be able to check mark all those personal needs in the Lazy Hype High Rise Legging.”

Do you plan on expanding your collection to even more sustainable products? (if so what?)

“1000%. I have a little godson coming in August so I need merch for him ASAP! I don’t know we will be able to hit his delivery date, but we will be working on it. Men’s is also a category I would like to expand into and maybe one day even shoes!”

What is your mission statement?

“There’s no such thing as complete sustainability. There’s no right or wrong when it comes to making an eco-friendly effort- any attempt is better than none at all. Even if it’s a lazy one, but let’s get started and create hype.”

Questions about Lizeth’s inspiration for her brand

What do you look for in models/ influencers to represent your brand?

“I try to make sure the models don’t represent any specific race, look diverse, and have a unique social media presence because I want everyone to feel a part of the brand. Also, diversity in body types and sizes. This brand is for everyone.”

Can you elaborate on the recycled materials you use to make your active wear & accessories?

Most of the garments are composed of a high percentage of recycled plastic bottles. The plastic from the bottle is collected to make mini chips that then create the yarn, which is mixed with recycled or organic cotton, spandex, or rayon; depending on the garment, and then turned into fabric. The accessories are bags made from jute plant or cotton, socks composed of organic cotton, candles hand-poured into a glass container, and the jewelry is handmade from new brass which is recycled scrap.”   

Who/ what was your inspiration to become a designer?

“At first, I mainly just wanted to fill a need out in the market. Coming from a fashion background I knew the steps I needed to take just wasn’t sure how to get there. As I built my team, I developed a crazy amount of respect and love for them, so now they are my inspiration, along with just wanting sustainability initiatives top of mind for everyone.”

What advice do you have to young aspiring fashion designers?

“I would say be humble, patient, kind, and be ready to work really hard. It’s important to stay humble and patient so you can fill and understand anyone’s shoes. Fashion is all a network, so kindness goes a long way and 12hour days are a no brainer… I still have them everyday.”

Read more fashion interviews at clichemag.com
Images provided by Lazy Hype 

10 Black-Owned Vintage Shops to Support Today

by

In just a few short months, the coronavirus’ impact on local businesses has already been substantial, creating lasting consequences for black-owned vintage shops in particular. While both global powerhouses and local retailers have shuttered their doors, local businesses have been hit the hardest with staggering financial consequences. Consumer preferences rapidly shift from hedonic to utilitarian as the demand and budget for investment goods dwindle across various consumer demographics. The pandemic’s implications for the garment industry are no different: consumers are increasingly prioritizing affordable, long-lasting essentials over ephemeral trends or designer staples. The need to shop sustainably becomes more crucial than ever. 

It is important to recognize that black-owned businesses in particular have been disproportionately affected as the pandemic and resurgence in political turbulence coincide. And as consumers, it is our responsibility to remember who and what we are supporting with our purchasing power. While protesting, supporting grassroots organizations, petitioning, and engaging in conversations on racial justice are crucial for political progress, supporting black-owned businesses is one of the most impactful and sustainable ways to demonstrate allyship. After all, elevating black voices and supporting black communities are necessary to create lasting changes. 

Below is a list of ten top black-owned thrift stores and consignment shops, which offer one-of-a-kind vintage staples at accessible costs all over the country. From Fyre Vintage, a philanthropic vintage shop celebrating local artisans, to Small Needs, a vintage wonderland, these stores offer the opportunity to promote black-owned local businesses, shop sustainably, and find timeless statement pieces for your wardrobe. Think carefully about the implications of your purchases, remember the people behind the clothes you’re supporting, promote black-owned businesses and artisans, and have fun digging! 

10. Roam Vintage

Founded by Natasha Zoë Garrett, Roam Vintage is an online thrift store based in LA. Natasha hand-picks and curates Roam Vintage’s product assortment of clothing, accessories, and home decor. Roam vintage is the perfect place to browse for intricate, earth-toned garments, chunky knits, and leather accessories. 

New @RoamVintage drop for sale on 6/11 at 6:30 PM PST. Photo credits: Roam Vintage Instagram Page https://www.instagram.com/roam.vintage/

9. Shirley and Alice

Shirley and Alice was founded by Khalilah Williams-Webb, the personal stylist for Brooklyn-based indy consignment store offers one-of-a-kind vintage staples. From a custom Alexander Wang purse to an embroidered 70s vest, shopping here is like digging through a treasure chest. In addition to being a vintage dreamland, Shirley and Alice supports local designers and businesses through collaborations and partnerships. It also fosters a strong sense of community among its fans through its pop up events, from Wine and Sip night to art fairs. 

8. Ephrance Vintage

Ephrance Vintage is an Austin-based vintage store and Depop shop that features bold colors, geometric prints, and androgynous silhouettes. In addition to offering funky everyday staples, Ephrance Vintage is currently donating 75% of its proceeds to Six Square, a cultural center in Austin that celebrates black arts, music, and history.

7. SofistaFunk

Founded by Creative Director Arlinda McIntosh, The Sofistafunk label promotes slow-fashion consumption through its versatile, zero-waste skirts, which are all Handmade-to-Order. The brand brings Victorian-style silhouettes to the contemporary market with their funky details and couture prints. The voluminous skirts are designed to be worn for a myriad of occasions. The signature skirt, called The Gathering, is inspired by McIntosh’s childhood memories of her mother working in cotton fields in North Carolina. As Arlinda explained, “I was especially drawn to their full skirts, which seemed to blow musically on the wind, they were passed down and multifunctional.  I’d watch them pin the hemlines up to the waist to create a large pocket that would hold various items needed for that day’s tasks, then by simply changing a few things and adding accessories, that same skirt that served them so well during the day seemed to magically transform into the most elegant outfit for other activities throughout the week.  These and other memories left me with a full Anthology of future “Skirt Stories” to tell.”

Sofistafunk’s signature “Gathering Skirt” in its Reversible Late Day Style. Photo credits: https://sofistafunk.com/collections/the-gathering/products/a-late-day-gathering-1

6. Kuration Collective

Kuration Collective, a funky collection of hand-picked Alaskan vintage, is a Depop and Instagram-based second-hand resale shop. The brand prides itself upon its intricately-curated 80s Alaskan aesthetic and timeless collection of vintage Disney staples. The prices fall between $25.00 -$125.00, offering a wide array of styles from graphic tee’s to occasionwear. Kuration Collective donates 10% of its profits to Essie Justice Group, a nonprofit, intersectionalist organization of women combatting mass incarceration reform.

90s Disney Mom Jeans for sale on Kuration Collective’s Depop page. Photo credits: https://www.instagram.com/p/CBJbQZ9ldfi/

5. Marché Rue Dix

Marché Rue Dix, a concept store situated in Crown Heights Brooklyn, is any creative’s wonderworld. Their brick and mortar location carries quality vintage clothing, along with the work of contemporary Brooklyn creatives. From graphic tee’s and natural beauty products to teas and spices, Marché Rue Dix carries it all.

4. Second Hand Shawty

A global second-hand powerhouse, Second Hand Shawty is an eclectic e-commerce platform that prides itself upon its inclusive, one-of-a-kind wardrobe. Gender non-conforming and inclusive in sizing, the statement garments feature fun colors, oversized silhouettes, and funky 80s styles. Most garments are priced between $20.00 – $40.00. 

3. People of 2Morrow

People of 2Morrow is an e-commerce fashion, accessory, and home decor vintage shop. The brand’s core values are centered around environmental sustainability, and it seeks to provide social responsible garments and home adornment for the eco-conscious millennial. With a slightly higher price point than the majority of the brands on this list, the platform features some designer finds. Most of the garments are around $80.00- $100.00. 

80s Fuchsia Linen Blazer for sale on Peopleof2Morrow’s online store. Photo credits: https://www.peopleof2morrow.com/products/fuchsia-linen-vintage-blazer

2. Small Needs

A thrifting fanatic favorite, Small Needs is an online Etsy shop that sells whimsical designer vintage-wear. Its carefully curated collection is enchantingly beautiful, from its vintage 1960s womens clothing and fairy tale dresses and Dior blazers to its plissé gowns, lace corsets, and ornate 70s jewelry. Just a scroll through their Instagram feed will take your breath away. Feminine, Parisian, dreamy, and sexy, Small Needs is the place to turn when you’re in search of a vintage investment. 

60s Lace Bustier for sale on Small Needs’ Etsy Store. Photo credits: https://www.instagram.com/p/CBCDd0ng4m8/

1. Fyre Vintage

Fyre Vintage is a Michigan-based vintage shop founded by @Daynabyday. Dayna strives to combat the dire environmental impact of fast fashion by encouraging second-hand shopping and supporting local businesses. Through Fyre Vintage, she seeks to promote second-hand consumption and to celebrate local artisans and businesses. 10% of Fyre’s proceeds are used to purchase sustainable, new clothing to donate to women’s shelters in Detroit.  

90s Jones New York Oversized Houdstooth Blazer for sale on Fyre Vintage. Photo credits: https://www.fyrevintage.com/shop/vintage-jones-new-york-houndstooth-oversized-blazer

Read more fashion articles at Clichemag.com
Photo credits: Roam Vintage, SofistaFunk, Kuration Collective, People of 2Morrow, Small Needs, & Fyre Vintage

How Fashion Brands are Approaching Sustainability

by

Many businesses have come under criticism for their approach on environmental issues, with some consumers even switching their most loyal brands to competitors as a result.  That being said, innovative businesses are now quickly realizing that deploying an eco-conscious tangential change in their material sourcing is what the consumers of 2019 want.

fast fashion

Pexels / Pixabay

Sustainability within retail refers to the sourcing of eco-friendly materials that create the fabrics used in clothing. Other factors include the working conditions of the people producing the materials, the materials total carbon footprint as well as the companies process of waste removal.  Other means of late come in the form of upcycling, which refers to the creative re-use of clothing into newer materials. This could be anything from turning old jumpers into cushion covers or simply turning dresses into crop tops.

Environmental villains

DWilliams / Pixabay

Fast Fashion is one of the main causes of the huge amount of unnecessary waste in the clothing industry. It’s a contemporary term used by retailers to express the rapid process of the mass-production of clothes in order to keep up with the latest trends at a much lower cost.

Made quickly and inexpensively, the concept allows fashion enthusiasts to look similar to their chosen trends at a much more affordable cost, which in all actuality, allows for a certain equality no matter the individuals financial income.

Reality is that it’s everything taking place behind the scenes of this fashion movement that have angered the environmentalists among us and rightly so – with researchers believing that throwaway disposable clothing like the types fast fashion churns out, is contributing more towards climate change than that of air and sea travel. How can anyone justify paying £3 for a t shirt?

Environmental efforts

The stubborn, adamant campaigners have once again influenced the stratagem of a retailing powerhouse. Despite Burberry burning all their unwanted stock a few years ago, they did announce towards the end of last year that going forward, not only would they be stopping this practice, they would also be stopping the use of real fur.

Massive brands with large consumer followings such as H&M are starting to roll out their efforts to a more sustainable planet. They announced last year that they aim to use only recycled materials by 2030 and by 2040 it wants to be 100% climate positive. Of course, it’s one thing to make a bold statement but it’s another to follow up on it by implementing changes immediately.  As the world’s second largest clothing retailer, H&M currently source 35% of materials from recycled or sustainably sourced materials and although their ultimate goals are commendable, they still have a long way to go in order to achieve them.

Going ‘eco’ shouldn’t mean a change of desirability of the clothing.  People buy clothes because they like the aesthetics, the style or the brand.  Going green shouldn’t mean beige, “oatmeal-colored fashion that are oversized or lacking in any sort of luxury” as Stella McCartney puts it, it’s a nod in the direction of the way fashion brands are being experimental when it comes to how they continuously mold their strategies.

What contributes towards a bad footprint?

Nietjuh / Pixabay

Although efforts are being made to reduce the massive carbon footprint caused by the retail sector, including sustainable cotton initiatives to reduce the amount of water used, as well as monitoring energy and chemical use, the balance has actually tilted in the direction of the consumer.

With growing demands to stay on top of the latest fashion, the unquenchable desire means people are buying more and more clothes, including retail uniforms.   In fact, since 2012, the amount of clothes we have purchased has risen 10%.  Not only are we buying more, the rate at which they’re getting discarded is also increasing.

To the future

The younger generation have really taken to the rehoming of certain brands and rare items of clothing. Although vintage shops have been around for some time, the collection of certain brands such as Ralph Lauren and Fred Perry have gained somewhat of a cult following amongst Generation Z.

The celebration and attraction to such brands has allowed huge amounts of clothes to find homes instead of being thrown away by disinterested owners, which begs the question are branded, higher-quality clothes and uniforms built for longevity and second owners rather than the fast-fashion clothing of today.

Read more fashion articles at Cliché Magazine
Images provided by Pixabay CC License